Archive for sodium

Won-Ton Tyme!

Won-ton Tyme 

 

 

 

 

 

Wontons aren’t just for the chinese restaurant or for those with a little more exposure; the occasional appetizer with the standard sweet & sour sauce. However you can turn these little gems into just the thing for your party or dinner. Though this post shows you how to make won tons and there’s a nifty recipe for “A” filling. I’ll have to show you how to make the soup another time. Don’t worry, it’s a standard comsomme’ recipe. (only one of the hardest soups to make.)

 

First you need to get together your  Mise en place… (a French phrase defined by the Culinary Institute of America as “everything in place“, as in set up.)

Ingredients:

  • 10-20 6×6 inch wonton skins (4×4 inch would be better)
  • (2) – 8 oz boneless skinless chix breasts
  • 4 tsp chopped scallion (set half to the side)
  • 3/4 tsp minced fresh ginger
  • 1 tsp minchd fresh garlic
  • 1 tbsp S&B White Seasoned Salt
  • 2 Egg whites
  • 1 tbsp toasted sesame oil
  • 1 1/2 tsp soy sauce
  • 1/2 tbsp Crushed Red Pepper

Equipment:

  • Mini Deep Fryer (optional)
  • Mini Food Processor
  • Cutting Board
  • 4 C.  Simmering, Seasoned Chicken Stock
  • Chef’s French Knife
  • Several small storage containers
  • Rubber spatula
  • Lg Slotted spoon
  • Teaspoon
  • Pastry Brush
  • 3 Hand Towels or Cleaning Cloth’s

Directions:

Place all ingredients in the food processor and puree’ until smooth. Remove lid, stir with rubber spatula and continue to puree’  for another 15 seconds. Remove from bowl and place in a storage container & refrigerate for 1 hr. Assemble the rest of your materials and start to heat your stock or heat up your mini fryer.

wonton skin

Place the Won-ton skins on the cutting board and remove 11/2 to 2 inch’s from the top and right side. *(If you want larger wonton’sleave them at their original size.)

 

 

 

Place 3/4 tsp of pureed chicken mix in the middle of the won-ton,

tsp of filling

 

 

With a pastry brush or tip of a cloth dab the edges of the wonton with water or egg wash (egg yolk + water).   

brushing wonton

 

 

 

 

Fold the bottom roght corner to meet the top left corner and press all the air out & to seal the won-ton. It should look like a triangle…

sealing wonton
 

 

 

 

Pick up won-ton & hold with your index finger in the middle of the won-ton. (section with filling in it.) Brush the left or right tip of the triangle with water or egg-wash

Holding wonton

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fold the dry tip over your index finger then do the same with the wet side and press together firmly to seal.

Fold #2

Fold # 1

 

 

 

 

 

Set on the cutting board, and open up to reveal just the top of the filling. Cover with a damp towel & repeat until the desired amount is reached.

Open top

 

 

 

 

 

 

Place wontons in deep fryer a few at a time & fry until light golden brown; approx 2 full minutes. (cut one in half to make sure the filling is cooked all the way through) Remove from fryer oil and place on top of papertowel to drain all excess oil.

Frying

 

 

 

 

 

 

If simmering; place a few won-tons in thesimmering stock and simmer for approx 4-5 minutes. When cooked remove from stock and rinse with cool water to stop cooking. Reserve in storage container and keep cool until needed.

Simmering the wonton

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprinkle fried Wontons with a little S&B White Seasoned Salt, Black and White sesame seeds, and remaining scallions. Serve with an asian style plum sauce, teriyaki dipping sauce, duck sauce or what ever you’re in the mood for.

white-seasoned-salt

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If serving in a soup, gently warm the wontons in a hot water bath, place in a bowl with soup garnish and pour hot broth over the Won-tons.

wonton soup

 

 

 

 

 

 

*For a vegetatrian option, combine…

  • 1 C. chopped tofu
  • 1 1/2 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 1/2 tsp soy sauce
  • 1 tsp hoisin sauce
  • 2 tbsp chopped scallion
  • 1 tbsp S&B White Seasoned Salt
  • 2 tsp julienne snow pea pods
  • 2 tsp shredded carrots
  • 2 tsp chopped shiitake mushrooms
  • 2 tsp fine chopped sweet red peppers
  • 2 tsp chopped bean sprouts
  • 1 tsp minced garlic
  • 1 tsp minced ginger
  • 1 tsp crushed red pepper

 

Toss all ingredients together and let sit for 5 minutes, drain the juices and repeat the steps to fill the Won-tons. Fry or simmer for the same amount of time alotted.

 

For a video presentation (coming soon) check out our Group page on Facebook @ S&B SeasoningsINC

Daily iodide requirements

Iodide

Hey everyone. I’m here to enlighten you with a few nutritional facts that will help you in your decision making when it comes to heartsmart and good for you food. Even at the Healthy Eating Club there are articles which explain in depth how too little, or too much iodide can affect your health. How much should you intake on a daily basis and from what other food sources can you daily intake be reached.

(*)From the Healthy Eating Club…

*Our bodies must have an adequate intake of iodine to form the hormones produced by the thyroid gland. These hormones regulate our bodies’ metabolic rate. If the dietary level of iodine is inadequate, the gland, which is in the neck, swells and produces goitre. *Unless treated, this condition can cause mental retardation and stunted growth in children, and hair loss, slowed reflexes, dry, coarse skin and other effects in adults.
Excessive amounts of iodine can also lead to goitre. This has occurred where foods, such as seaweeds, which are rich in iodine, are commonly eaten. Although excessive iodine intake is not common, it should be noted that, in addition to food, many cough medicines and milk contaminated with an iodine containing sanitizing agent also contribute to iodine intake. But it is unlikely that any harmful effects would occur with habitual intakes up to 300 micrograms per day.

Recommended daily dietary intake of iodine (Australia):

Infants…………………… 50-60 micrograms
Children………………… 70-150 micrograms
Adult Men……………… 150 micrograms
Adult Women…………. 120 micrograms
Preganacy…………….. 150 Micrograms
Lactation……………….. 200 micrograms

  FOOD   IODINE CONTENT
  (micrograms per 100 grams of food)

Salt(iodized)…………. 3000
Seafood……………….. 66
Vegetable……………… 32
Meat………………….. 26
Eggs…………………….. 26
Dairy Products……………. 13
Bread & Cereal…………… 10
Fruits…………………….. 4

With iodized salt (per 100 grams) you will
get 20 times the daily amount of Iodide that you would require for your daily intake. Now imagine that type of abuse for the next 20 to 60+  years. You can actually cut out iodized enriched salts all together, (and use a Non-Iodized Salt such as *Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt*,) by following the foods chart above.  Now it should be noted that this is a chart is Australian, however, I don’t think that Australia is intentionally out to mislead it’s people when it comes to the health of their country. I hope this has helped you in deciding to better your health.

Please leave comments…

Salt, Salt, Salt…

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Well we’ve come a long way from the box of salt with the little girl on the cover with the dog pulling at her shorts. Now we have a lot of different varieties and they’re all have their twist on the market. Personally I don’t care if how fine or exotic the salt may be if it still has a high sodium content, then it is still dangerous to the health of every consumer. Let’s face facts, ppl usually don’t want to face reality when it comes to their health especially when it may mean sacrificing the quality and flavor of their food. So ppl continue to use (abuse) salt until their doctor takes them off it totally and then they have a hard time finding something to suplement them in their comfort zone when it comes to their seasoned food. Ppl, I think Mrs Dash looks like chopped grass from your lawnmower, and to just switch from salt to plain herbs is just……………….wrong! Here are a few of the salt’s I like, but check their SODIUM CONTENT people!!!

O.K. first on the list is Diamond Chrystal Kosher salt.

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This is by far my favorite salt to use in the Kitchen. Lite in taste, not over powering and a clean finish on the palet when done. It dosen’t overpower the food and enhances whatever it is you are cooking. One of the few salts I would use in a marinade. The sodium content is equally impressive. A full 66% less sodium than other brands of it kind. This is a salt I would reccomand for using for ppl who require a low sodium diet or are just concerned about the sodium level a loved one is taking in.

Next we have Fleur de sel

fleur-de-sel.jpg Not a good pic I know, but it’s what they had. Now this salt is the prize of the sea it is said to have the most delicate flavor and virtually blend in with the food you use it on. Called the saffron of the sea, this fine grey sea salt is the first top layer of evaporated seasalt in an evaporating pool of sea water. (You know what they say about cream, eh.) I’ve often imaginged what it would to my food if I used  it in my Kitchen, at a pricy $19.71 a lb, I chose to leave it up to my imagination. I don’t know about the sodium content but I’d assume it’s the standard580mg per serving.

 Smoked Sea Salt

smoked-seasalt.jpgsmoked-sea-salt.jpg

Smoked seasalt is verrry different and can be used on a variety of dishes. I’d mainly use this salt as a finishing salt to sprinkle over a dish, to add an outdoor-sy flavor and feel to the dish. * ie seafood/grilled salmon, rosated turkey breast, and earthy type vegetables/mushrooms, and asparagas, etc. The sodium content is the standard 580mg per serving but you just need a sprinkle for the flavor enhancement.

Now we have Red and Black Sea Salt

red-seasalt.jpgblack-seasalt.jpg

These salts have a head on blast of full salt flavor. Very little flavor difference because of the colors, but there is some distinction. Most, if not all, of these salts are from Hawaii and processed in a special way. Artisan salt farmers in Hawaiiharvest these special salts in a hand crafter mannerto give the salt the highest qualityand flavor Evaporated in ground pools, dried in greenhouses and mixed with Lava rock(Black) and alae clay(red) for a high mineral content. Sodium content is the standard 580 mg per serving but these aren’t salts you use in everyday dishes. Y ou can utilize these in sauces, in brines and cures for drying and smoking meats and seafood. Because of their decorative appeal, you can use them to add a splash of color for a bed of Oysters or Clams.

… and finally we have Maldon brand Sea Salt.

 maldon-seasalt.jpgmaldon-seasalt2.jpg

Of my favorite salts, this has to be #2 on the list. I love it because of the way it crystalizes before it’s harvested.
*see above*
When sea salt crystalizes, it should form a pyramid shape because of the way the water is evaporating.
It has excellet flavor and dissolves quickly into whatever dish you’re preparing. You can utilize this salt on anything from standing rib roast to a crisp garden salad. The sodium level is the standard 580 mg. per serving, but you won’t use that much. It has no overpowering taste but still finishes clean on the tongue. This one is definately a keeper.

Till next time yall, this is the one and only “RudeBoii” Chef, hittin ya up;…………… and I’m out!

Kosher Salt…

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What is the Difference Between Kosher Salt and Sea Salt? 

Many chefs prefer kosher salt in cooking certain dishes, usually as a topping, to add special crunch or taste to food.  Kosher salt is made by similar evaporation processes as cubic table salt, both plain and iodized.  However some processes allow their crystals to growth at normal atmospheric pressure which makes a different shaped and larger crystal possible.  These are used for Kosher Salt.  Kosher salt contains no additives.  In other manufacturing processes, Kosher Salt is made by compressing table salt crystals under pressure and then sizing the resulting agglomerates to yield a coarse-type salt. 

Sea salt is produced by evaporation of sea water at atmospheric temperature and pressure.  The crystals tend to form inverted pyramid shapes not all that different from Kosher Salt produced at atmospheric pressure referred to in the first paragraph.  Depending upon the geographic location, altitude, and composition of the salt ponds from which the salt originates, the salt may take on certain colors representing some of the trace minerals in the area.  Some of these impart a different taste or flavor, either pleasant or possibly objectionable to the taste of the salt, and hence, the food to which it is added.  Mainly, it is a matter of preference and cost.  Per pound, sea salt is far more expensive when compared to Kosher Salt or regular cubic table salt. 

Are “Kosher Salt” and Table Salt that is Kosher Different? 

Kosher Salt is the name of a particular type of salt (sodium chloride) that is available in supermarkets and other stores that sell groceries.  It is produced by a manufacturing method explained above and is certified as Kosher by one of many rabbinical inspection institutions that carry out food plant inspections.  Table Salt, both plain and iodized, is usually listed as manufactured under the same rabbinical institutions.  An identifying emblem will notify the consumer that the salt has been produced and packaged under strict kosher conditions.  If the kosher emblem is missing from the label, it is safe to assume that the salt is not necessarily certified as produced under kosher inspection.    

With table salt, the size of the crystal is smaller than Kosher Salt,  and it is usually cubic in shape.  Table salt contains additives to keep the small crystals from caking and clumping.  All salts are very prone to pick up moisture, and smaller crystals are capable of adding more moisture than larger ones.  As the crystals release moisture with changes in relative humidity, the crystals form new bonds and stick together.  The salt crystals must stay uniform for proper ingredient dosing of foods and to fit through the holes in the salt shakers!