Archive for restaurant

4 New Ways to Eat

Trendy yet stylish, this dish give your guests a new way to dine. From Lunch to Dinner, Hors d’oeuvres to Appetizers this little Beauty gets the job done. With 4 compartments you can either have 4 completely different entrees or 4 entrees based on a similar theme.

Bento Box #5

*Going clockwise from top left…

  • Smoked Salmon wrapped Crab cake with a Chive Creme Fraiche
  • Broiled Grouper with a Tomato & Scallion Rice Pilaf
  • Grilled Pepper Beef Skewer served with a Potato & Shiitake Mushroom hash
  • 6 Pepper Chicken Breast w/ Angel Hair Pasta & Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

Bento Box #2

  • Tempura Battered Tuna Loin on Exotic Greens
  • Smoked Chicken Sachet w/ dried Cranberries and Brie Cheese
  • Corn and Crab fritters with a Plum dipping sauce
  • Sausage stuffed Portabella Mushrooms with Spinach & Parmesan cheese

dscf1148.jpg

  •  Grilled Salmon with Ratatouille
  • Grilled Mahi-Mahi w/ Cucumber salad
  • BBQ Shrimp Skewer with Truffle Mac & Cheese
  • Scallops with Bacon in an Asiago Cream sauce in Filo Cups

 Bento Box #3

Finally we have…

  • Shrimp Skewer with Avocado, angel Hair pasta, & Boursin Cream sauce.
  • Chicken, Spinach, and Feta Cheese, Filo triangles
  • Grilled Tuna with a Cucumber and Ginger relish or slaw
  • Blackened Mahi-Mahi with a Mango Salsa

This is a completely new way to satisfy virtually every taste in your party, from savory to sweet,  and tart to mellow. The only thing you have to worry about these boxes is the count at the end of the night. Serve your guests with traditional chop sticks and watch them fumble around. (LOL) Great ice breaker for the dinner or cocktail tables.  

I’ve checked 3 different sites and the avg cost is $12.50 per box…

www.ablekitchen.com
www.buy4asianlife.com
www.creativefoodpackaging.com

A little steep for a one person tray or plate, so I kept digging.

I found a 3-Tier Bento Box (3 boxes) for $13.99 at www.buy4asianlife.com 
3-tier-bento-box.jpg

I know, I know, a lil pricey especially if you want to have 1 box per person and you’re having a party for 10 and above ppl. Think out of the (Bento) box though, buy a couple at first and use them as appetizer trays, by the time everyone catches up with your idea you’ll be serving them 1 to a person with multiple entrees in each compartment. They’ll still be wondering how you did it.

Keep up the great work and don’t for get the personalized fortune cookies.

This is your Rude Boii chef signing off; and I’m out!!!

Advertisements

Kosher Salt…

kosher-salt.jpg

What is the Difference Between Kosher Salt and Sea Salt? 

Many chefs prefer kosher salt in cooking certain dishes, usually as a topping, to add special crunch or taste to food.  Kosher salt is made by similar evaporation processes as cubic table salt, both plain and iodized.  However some processes allow their crystals to growth at normal atmospheric pressure which makes a different shaped and larger crystal possible.  These are used for Kosher Salt.  Kosher salt contains no additives.  In other manufacturing processes, Kosher Salt is made by compressing table salt crystals under pressure and then sizing the resulting agglomerates to yield a coarse-type salt. 

Sea salt is produced by evaporation of sea water at atmospheric temperature and pressure.  The crystals tend to form inverted pyramid shapes not all that different from Kosher Salt produced at atmospheric pressure referred to in the first paragraph.  Depending upon the geographic location, altitude, and composition of the salt ponds from which the salt originates, the salt may take on certain colors representing some of the trace minerals in the area.  Some of these impart a different taste or flavor, either pleasant or possibly objectionable to the taste of the salt, and hence, the food to which it is added.  Mainly, it is a matter of preference and cost.  Per pound, sea salt is far more expensive when compared to Kosher Salt or regular cubic table salt. 

Are “Kosher Salt” and Table Salt that is Kosher Different? 

Kosher Salt is the name of a particular type of salt (sodium chloride) that is available in supermarkets and other stores that sell groceries.  It is produced by a manufacturing method explained above and is certified as Kosher by one of many rabbinical inspection institutions that carry out food plant inspections.  Table Salt, both plain and iodized, is usually listed as manufactured under the same rabbinical institutions.  An identifying emblem will notify the consumer that the salt has been produced and packaged under strict kosher conditions.  If the kosher emblem is missing from the label, it is safe to assume that the salt is not necessarily certified as produced under kosher inspection.    

With table salt, the size of the crystal is smaller than Kosher Salt,  and it is usually cubic in shape.  Table salt contains additives to keep the small crystals from caking and clumping.  All salts are very prone to pick up moisture, and smaller crystals are capable of adding more moisture than larger ones.  As the crystals release moisture with changes in relative humidity, the crystals form new bonds and stick together.  The salt crystals must stay uniform for proper ingredient dosing of foods and to fit through the holes in the salt shakers!