Kosher Salt…

kosher-salt.jpg

What is the Difference Between Kosher Salt and Sea Salt? 

Many chefs prefer kosher salt in cooking certain dishes, usually as a topping, to add special crunch or taste to food.  Kosher salt is made by similar evaporation processes as cubic table salt, both plain and iodized.  However some processes allow their crystals to growth at normal atmospheric pressure which makes a different shaped and larger crystal possible.  These are used for Kosher Salt.  Kosher salt contains no additives.  In other manufacturing processes, Kosher Salt is made by compressing table salt crystals under pressure and then sizing the resulting agglomerates to yield a coarse-type salt. 

Sea salt is produced by evaporation of sea water at atmospheric temperature and pressure.  The crystals tend to form inverted pyramid shapes not all that different from Kosher Salt produced at atmospheric pressure referred to in the first paragraph.  Depending upon the geographic location, altitude, and composition of the salt ponds from which the salt originates, the salt may take on certain colors representing some of the trace minerals in the area.  Some of these impart a different taste or flavor, either pleasant or possibly objectionable to the taste of the salt, and hence, the food to which it is added.  Mainly, it is a matter of preference and cost.  Per pound, sea salt is far more expensive when compared to Kosher Salt or regular cubic table salt. 

Are “Kosher Salt” and Table Salt that is Kosher Different? 

Kosher Salt is the name of a particular type of salt (sodium chloride) that is available in supermarkets and other stores that sell groceries.  It is produced by a manufacturing method explained above and is certified as Kosher by one of many rabbinical inspection institutions that carry out food plant inspections.  Table Salt, both plain and iodized, is usually listed as manufactured under the same rabbinical institutions.  An identifying emblem will notify the consumer that the salt has been produced and packaged under strict kosher conditions.  If the kosher emblem is missing from the label, it is safe to assume that the salt is not necessarily certified as produced under kosher inspection.    

With table salt, the size of the crystal is smaller than Kosher Salt,  and it is usually cubic in shape.  Table salt contains additives to keep the small crystals from caking and clumping.  All salts are very prone to pick up moisture, and smaller crystals are capable of adding more moisture than larger ones.  As the crystals release moisture with changes in relative humidity, the crystals form new bonds and stick together.  The salt crystals must stay uniform for proper ingredient dosing of foods and to fit through the holes in the salt shakers!   

Advertisements

No comments yet»

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: